ARE YOU VAIN OR CONFIDENT?

“As I researched and prepared these presentations, I became particularly interested in how perceptions are formed, how they govern the way we see, and how the way we see governs how we behave. This led me to a study of expectancy theory and self-fulfilling prophecies or the “Pygmalion effect”. It taught me that we must look at the lens through which we see the world, as well as at the world we see, and that the lens itself shapes how we interpret the world.”

Steven R. Covey: The 7 habits of Highly Effective people

YOU MUST BELIEVE YOU ARE A PRO BEFORE YOU CAN BECOME ONE

I’ve always been a little vain, but that does not mean I carry a high opinion of myself, or that I have an inflated ego. On the contrary, I believe I am much like most people. I have an incredibly fragile self-esteem. I’m realizing now that attitude is everything and mine often sets me back. My opinion of myself has two pivotal results: success and failure. I am in control of my own destiny.

I began writing this chapter by admitting my own vanity and by some accounts “vanity” is a failing attribute. “She’s so vain,” or “Yeah, he’s good looking but his ego is over the top.” Vanity is unattractive on an attractive person.

(To Be Continued)

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